Citizenship & Migration Pathway

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The Citizenship and Migration pathway is a specialization route for students interested in career paths related to immigration and naturalization. This pathway consists of a survey course – immigration – and a host of specialty and practical courses including, the immigration clinic and other related course such as crimigration, human rights, and advanced writing opportunities stemming from the citizenship and immigration seminar. The advanced courses allows students to delve deeper into an area of law that is both evolving and the subject of ongoing national debaters. These courses will allow students to become experts in this field, and will have the opportunity to study from some of the most experienced practitioners, well-known activists, and prolific scholars in the field.

There are a number of courses devoted to subjects within the broad area of Citizenship and Migration as well courses to help you prepare to take the bar examination. Students who want to pursue legal practice in the area of Citizenship and Migration should consider the courses below. Other courses, besides those listed, are offered under the FIU College of Law curriculum.

Please view the Schedule of Classes to determine which courses will be offered during the current school year.

Foundation Courses related to this pathway include: Constitutional Law, Criminal Law and Introduction to International & Comparative Law.

Core Courses

Immigration Law
LAW 6264 Immigration Law (2-3). This course examines the major aspects of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The interrelationship between the administrative agencies empowered to execute the Immigration and Nationality Act’s mandate will be studied. Major attention will be focused on the immigrant and nonimmigrant visa systems, political asylum and refugees, exclusion and deportation of the foreign-born, and naturalization. Policy implications of the statute and judicial interpretations are addressed.

International Human Rights Law
LAW 6263 International Human Rights Law (2-3). This course is an introduction to the international law protecting human rights. It examines the theory and the history of the field, together with key United Nations documents. International treaty and non-treaty mechanisms for protecting and promoting human rights, including regional systems and the role of nongovernmental organizations, are covered.

Citizenship and Immigration Seminar
LAW 6936 Seminar: Citizenship and Immigration. This seminar involves analyzing the construction and interpretation of the law of citizenship as well as the laws relating to national immigration policy, as specific instances of wider themes concerning democratic theory, social inclusion, hegemony, class, and race. The course will necessarily deal with the intersection of, on the one hand, citizenship law, immigration law, public international law, and constitutional law and, on the other hand, theoretical perspectives based on classical and enlightenment philosophy, critical race theory, post-colonial studies, Diaspora literature, and social theory generally. Students are expected to and will produce a final paper of publishable quality. Our learning will be achieved by having the students broken up into groups, ideally representing differing interest groups and factions, with an aim at developing solutions for some of the more controversial issues of the day.

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication
LAW 6114 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (3). This course examines topics not covered in the basic course in Criminal Procedure, including the grand jury process, bail, the plea-bargain process, right to jury trial, double jeopardy, joinder and severance, and right to confront and examine witnesses.

Civil Rights
LAW 7510 Civil Rights (2-3). This course focuses on selected federal statutes enacted to remedy violations of federal constitutional rights. The principal Reconstruction Era statutes, 42 U.S.C. sections 1981, 1982, and 1983, are examined in depth.

Family Law
LAW 6710 Family Law (3). This course examines state regulation of sexual and marital relationships, including the conflict between the doctrines of family privacy and state intervention in the marital relationship. Topics include: premarital controversies, capacity to marry and the formalities of marriage; rights and duties of marital partners; annulment and separation; divorce grounds and no-fault; spousal support and basic issues of property distribution; principles governing child custody and visitation; child support; mediation of property and custody issues; and regulation of non-traditional relationships.

Women and the Law
LAW 6235 Women and the Law (2-3). The course considers the legal treatment of sex differences in the construction and legitimization of the social status of women and men. Topics include rape, sexual harassment, incest, battery, sexuality, economic segregation, prostitution, and pornography. Central concerns to be pursued include the desirability of sex-neutral legislation and adjudication, the meaning for women of the legal distinction between the public and private spheres, competing theories of the origins of sex roles, and the differences between and similarities of traditional morality and a feminist critique of power.

Race and the Law
LAW 6234 Race and the Law (2-3). This course will consider contemporary theories of law and questions of racial justice, including the relationship between developments in the social sciences on the nature of race, racism, prejudice and discrimination, and the interpretation of constitutional and statutory protections against racial discrimination.
Advanced Electives

First Amendment
LAW 7511 First Amendment (2-3). This course is an examination of the historical origins and underlying values of the rights of conscience protected in the First Amendment. The emphasis will be on the fundamental principles articulated in Supreme Court interpretations of its provisions relating to free speech, free press, and religious liberty.

Community Law Teaching
LAW 7813 Community Law Teaching. The course focuses on the delivery of law-related education by law students to lay persons, specifically, high school students. Law students study legal pedagogy focusing on ways to teach legal concepts to high students and present classes about law, democracy and human rights in local high schools.

NAFTA and Other Regional Trade Agreements
LAW 6297 NAFTA and Other Regional Trade Agreements (2-3). This course analyzes the legal structures of non-global freer trade agreements, including but not limited to NAFTA. It reviews GATT Article XXIV and the economic and policy debate (global vs. regional trade arrangements); discusses key aspects of NAFTA, including industrial development, investment dispute and other disputes; and analyzes legal and policy issues relating to the negotiation of a Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA). Other regional trade arrangements, including the Southern Cone Common Market (Mercosur), are also considered. A focus of the course is efforts in NAFTA to deal with environmental and labor concerns.

Seminar: Citizenship and Immigration
LAW 6936 Seminar: Citizenship and Immigration. This seminar involves analyzing the construction and interpretation of the law of citizenship as well as the laws relating to national immigration policy, as specific instances of wider themes concerning democratic theory, social inclusion, hegemony, class, and race. The course will necessarily deal with the intersection of, on the one hand, citizenship law, immigration law, public international law, and constitutional law and, on the other hand, theoretical perspectives based on classical and enlightenment philosophy, critical race theory, post-colonial studies, Diaspora literature, and social theory generally. Students are expected to and will produce a final paper of publishable quality. Our learning will be achieved by having the students broken up into groups, ideally representing differing interest groups and factions, with an aim at developing solutions for some of the more controversial issues of the day.
Experiential Courses
 Faculty

Ediberto Roman, Professor of Law
305.348.7254

Juan Carlos Gomez, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor of Law
305.348.3179

Mary Gundrum, Director, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor
305.348.7389