Professor Stanley Fish in NY Times: Evidence in Science and Religion
Photo Courtesy of Wesleyan University

In the NY Times Opinion Pages, FIU Law School Professor Stanley Fish revisits the question of the place of evidence in the discourses and practices of science and religion.

Stanley Fish is the Davidson-Kahn Distinguished University Professor and Professor of Law, Florida International University, and Dean Emeritus of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Distinguished Professor of English, Criminal Justice and Political Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Evidence in Science and Religion, Part Two

In the post previous to this one, I revisited the question of the place of evidence in the discourses and practices of science and religion. I was prompted by a discussion on the the show “Up w/ Chris Hayes” (MSNBC, March 25) in which Steven Pinker and Richard Dawkins stated with great force and confidence that a key difference between science and religion is that the conclusions of the former are based on evidence that has emerged in the course of rigorous rational inquiry publicly conducted, while the conclusions of the latter are based on dogma, faith, unexamined authority, subjectivity and mere trust … Read more at NYTimes.com »

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